Artist Renderings of Wrigley New Triangle Building and Patio

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It’s not sleigh bells ringing in Wrigleyville — that’s the jingle-jangle of construction season.

Wrigley Field renovations are in full swing after the Cubs’ post-season cost the construction schedule six weeks off the top. Since the season ended, the marquee has come down and crews finished erecting the steel frame that will become the Cubs office building.

This year, work is focused on the office building, a state-of-the-art team clubhouse and the plaza, which some hope will become a town square for the neighborhood for events and gatherings.

The Cubs envision hosting farmers markets and children’s movies on non-game nights and creating an ice rink in the winter. Beyond that, they’d like to host up to 25 larger-scale events on the plaza per year and allow people to carry alcohol within its perimeter.

But that depends on what neighbors will agree to.

The second year of construction at Wrigley Field includes major work on the plaza and office building that will have first-floor retail and dining. [Provided/Chicago Cubs]

Earlier this month, the Cubs and Ald. Tom Tunney (44th) convened a group of neighborhood leaders to work out the details, said Mike Lufrano, Cubs vice president of community affairs.

Years ago, that discussion was tabled when the plaza was just a distant plan, but “here we are, and the plaza is getting closer to being opened,” Lufrano said. The group will continue to meet as its members get feedback from neighborhood organizations.

“My goal for this plaza would be for it to really become a town square of Lakeview and not just an outdoor beer garden during games,” said Adam Rosa, president of Hawthorne Neighbors.

The second year of construction at Wrigley Field includes major work on the plaza and office building that will have first-floor retail and dining. [Provided/Chicago Cubs]

But Rosa and other neighbors posed concerns about allowing alcohol on the plaza and not allowing events that will disturb Wrigley Field’s neighbors.

Lufrano said events would end at a reasonable time — as late as 10 or 10:30 p.m. on the weekends — and “the important thing is to talk through these questions so we know what we can have, and the neighborhood knows what to expect.”



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